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Latest Standard Edition Articles

  • 1 Oct 2020 1:07 PM | Anonymous

    A woman who was gifted an ancestry DNA kit says she has been left with more questions than answers after she received her results back. Katye Snow told her story on TikTok and explained how she discovered the man she grew up with and called Dad wasn’t her biological father.

    “A few months ago, my lovely brother got me one of those cool ancestry genealogy tests,” Ms Snow starts the video.

    “And because my father’s adopted and my mother doesn’t know her real father I thought it was really cool to figure out my genealogy maybe find out some medical issues I don’t know about.

    She was successful in finding “some medical issues I don’t know about.”

    You can read the full story in an article by Kamilia Palu in the Yahoo News website at: https://yhoo.it/3l3qA9l.

  • 1 Oct 2020 12:54 PM | Anonymous

    Heredis is a genealogy program that is very popular around the world. I don’t hear much about it in the U.S. but also know that it is one of the most popular genealogy programs in the world. It is available in several different languages which probably explains much of its popularity.

    Heredis is also one of the easier-to-use genealogy programs available today. I have it installed on my computer and am very impressed with it.

    Now the Heredis producers (in France) have announced a major update of the program. Here is the announcement:

    MONTPELLIER, FRANCE – SEPTEMBER 22, 2020 – Besides a colorful and exciting new design to try to brighten the special times we are going through, Heredis 2021 offers great new features AND boasts a multitude of long requested improvements.

    DYNAMIC ANCESTORS WHEEL
    The genealogist can from now on visualize a 360° representation of his family tree!! This wheel shape chart can be colored by generation, gender, quarter, by marked or “complete” persons, thus highlighting the most relevant data in his genealogy file. This representation allows the genealogist to quickly visualize if any ancestor is missing in any branch without leaving the navigation tab.


    Ancestors Wheel

    The wheel chart can include up to 12 generations. It can be exported to PDF and then be printed: this is a great-looking ancestors wheel chart to share with his relatives.

    Another version of the Ancestors Wheel


    DEAD ENDS
    A father or mother can’t seem to be found? It is not uncommon to come across abandoned children or children born with unknown fathers when doing genealogical research. In most cases, chances of finding out who the parents were are quite slim. The genealogist can now categorizes such “dead ends” in a quick and easy manner by checking the Untraceable Father and Untraceable Mother boxes. At any moment, he may thus declare these persons as Complete so he can move on and focus on more fruitful researches without wasting additional time in the genealogical endeavors. Thanks to this new label, the genealogist will see right away whether any ancestor needs to be searched for or not. Navigate the family tree while keeping an eye on such information, which is worth taking into consideration as the genealogist moves forward in his researches. In the end, the research follow-up becomes more reliable when measuring the progress of searches. This information can be found in the sheets or even in your GEDCOM file.


    Searching for Dead Ends

    PERSON AS COMPLETE

    Does the genealogist know full well that he won’t find any additional information on a given person in his genealogy? He may now indicate that this person is “complete” thanks to the “Declare as complete” label in the Personal Data tab. A huge time saver!

    IMPORT INDEXES
    From now on, the genealogist can retrieve indexes created by fellow genealogists or in other Heredis genealogy files. Retrieve his or her entire work on the places, including media, place descriptions, etc. Available for Surnames, Given Names, Occupations, Places and Sources!

    IMPROVEMENTS
    Heredis 2021 is also the result of a long work process between our hands-on users and our development team operating in the background to continuously improve the software. And, even more remarkably, this work was in part processed during the lockdown period when each of our developers was working remotely, yet still keeping in touch with users. Here are some of this new version’s improvements, which you will find both familiar and different at the same time:

    • Smart Search: take advantage of the option to process an entire selection of events, facts, or do searches within the note of a media; you may also perform searches on Ahnentafel numbers, implexes, or between one generation and another, • Custom reports: -additional fields: “creation date” and “change date” of a person; -a new option in the Places report: grouping a place name and its variants,
    • Merging assistant: alerts during merges have been added to encourage users to merge parents first and thus avoid mistakes…,
    • Swap parents easily: do so if one of your ancestor’s father or mother were inverted by mistake. The correction will be applied to all siblings,
    • Hide empty boxes in the ancestors’ tree chart from now on and get a better view of all available or missing data (Family tab > Ancestors),
    • Add a filter to Search Tracking to display treetops only: a real time saver that will let you see what is left to do and what to start with! Improvements galore to make a real difference in the genealogist everyday use of Heredis.

    AVAILABILITY
    Heredis 2021 for Windows and for Mac have been made available to all genealogists since September 22, 2020 on heredis.com and on the App Store.

  • 1 Oct 2020 10:19 AM | Anonymous
    Did you catch Covid-19? Perhaps you should blame your ancestors.
    According to an article by Maggie Fox in the CNN website:
    “Genes inherited from Neanderthal ancestors may be involved in some cases of severe Covid-19 disease, researchers in Germany reported Wednesday.
    A team of experts on Neanderthal genetics examined a strand of DNA that has been associated with some of the more serious cases of Covid-19 and compared it to sequences known to have been passed down to living Europeans and Asians from Neanderthal ancestors.
    The DNA strand is found on chromosome 3, and a team of researchers in Europe has linked certain variations in this sequence with the risk of being more severely ill with Covid-19.
    ‘Here, we show that the risk is conferred by a genomic segment … that is inherited from Neanderthals and is carried by about 50% of people in South Asia and about 16% of people in Europe today,’ Svante Paabo and Hugo Zeberg of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology wrote, in a paper accepted for publication in the journal Nature.”
    You can find the full article at: https://cnn.it/3jnaeYD.
  • 30 Sep 2020 4:00 PM | Anonymous

    The following announcement was written by the State Archives of North Carolina:

    After several years of digitizing the Division of Negro Education records from the Department of Public Instruction record group, the African American Education digitization project is now completely online!

    This digital collection covers the day by day interactions of the Division of Negro Education with the African American community. The collection ranges from the early to mid 20th century and includes correspondence, articles, speeches, reports, newspaper clippings and more. You can read about previous additions to this collection in Part OnePart Two, and Part Three of this blog series. The last addition to the collection is the Director’s Office: Newspaper Clippings series. It contains newspaper clippings largely covering racial segregation in education throughout the Southern United States during the 1950’s.

    The following series are now online:

    For more information on African American education, check out these NCpedia pages:

  • 30 Sep 2020 1:43 PM | Anonymous

    Elephind is a great service that searches online digital newspaper collections. Best of all, it is available free of charge.

    Elephind.com is a search engine that operates much like Google, Bing, and other search engines. The one thing that is different with Elephind is that it searches only historical, digitized newspapers. It enables you to search for free across many newspaper sites simultaneously rather than having to visit each collection’s web site separately.

    At this time Elephind has indexed 199,820,058 items from 4,267 newspaper titles. These include such well known sites as Chronicling America (the U.S.’s Library of Congress) and Trove (National Library of Australia), as well as smaller collections like Door County Library in Wisconsin. Many of the smaller newspaper sites are not well known and may be difficult to find with the usual search engines, but they are searchable from Elephind.com. A list of available newspaper collections that have been indexed so far is available at https://bit.ly/2EECuqG.

    Additional newspaper collections are added to Elephind’s indexes frequently.

    I found that Elephind operates in much the same manner as many other search engines. If you already know how to search for things in Google, DuckDuckGo, Bing, Yahoo, or elsewhere, you already know how to use Elephind. In fact, there are two search methods available on Elephind:

    1. When you first visit the site at http://www.elephind.com, you are greeted with a very simple search screen containing one data entry box. You can search for words or phases in much the same way as you do on Google although not all of Google’s sophisticated Boolean search terms are available on Elephind. You can find tips for using the search box at https://bit.ly/2S5mCk7.
    2. When visiting this same site at http://www.elephind.com, you will also see a highlighted link for “Advanced Search.” When you click on that, a more sophisticated search form appears, allowing you to narrow the search to any combination of specific newspaper titles, country, or a range of dates.

    I did a search for my own last name between the years 1811 and 1890 in the United States. It returned far too many “hits” for me to search through; so, I started narrowing the search by specifying first names and cities or towns of interest. I was soon looking at information of interest.

    I was impressed with the clarity of the newspaper pages I was able to view; but, of course, that is under the control of the individual newspaper collection. Elephind does not host the images on its own web site. Instead, it merely links to newspapers found on a wide variety of servers in a number of different countries from around the world.

    Elephind.com is a great tool for family historians, genealogists, and researchers to search historic, digitized newspaper archives from around the globe. Will Elephind locate newspaper articles about your ancestors? There is no way to tell in advance. You need to try it for a while to see. It is a free resource, so why not try it to see for yourself?

    Elephind may be found at http://www.elephind.com.

    Elephind is continuing to add more newspapers, so if at first you can’t find what you’re looking for, check back later. You also might want to add your name to the Elephind mailing list at https://dlconsulting646.activehosted.com/f/5 to receive an email message whenever a new collection is added.


  • 30 Sep 2020 1:38 PM | Anonymous

    The following is a message posted to the IAJGS (International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies) Public Records Access Alert mailing list:

    The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has been sued over its recent permanent regulations on application fees, which raises application fees for many essential immigration benefits by 30 to 200 percent, and eliminates most fee waivers for qualifying low income immigrants.

    The regulation covers more than the genealogy records, as it also increased the fees for immigration services. On August 20, 2020,  The American Immigration Lawyers Association and eight other organizations filed the law suit to block the regulation due to the exceeding large increase in filing fees across the board. To read the law suit filing see:   https://www.aila.org/infonet/aila-partners-sue-uscis-fee-rule

    The focus of the litigation is that fees for low income applicants making it very difficult for them to apply for naturalization. It also challenges the rule issued under an acting Secretary of Homeland Security and there states the persons, Chad Wolf and Kevin McAleenan do not have constitutional or statutory authority to issue the regulations. The litigation also challenges the abandonment of the practice of “ability to pay” model and adoption of “beneficiary pays” model. The suit was filed in the U.S. District Court of Northern district of California- San Francisco as that is where Immigrant Legal Resource Center’s principal place of business is in San Francisco, California, and East Bay Sanctuary Covenant’s principal place of business is in Berkeley, California. Other plaintiff’s are also located in California.

    The suit does not address the genealogy fees, rather its focus is on the immigrant application fees. Depending on the courts determine this case the genealogy fees may be changed from what goes into effect this October 2.

    If you are planning to order any records from USCIS at the current $65.00 rate for the index search and another $65.00 for the copy make certain your request is postmarked before October 2. The forms may be found at: https://www.uscis.gov/genealogy

    To see previous postings about the USCIS and the fee increases,  go to the archives of the IAJGS Records Access Alert at:  http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/private/records-access-alerts/. You must be registered to access the archives.  To register go to: http://lists.iajgs.org/mailman/listinfo/records-access-alerts  and follow the instructions to enter your email address, full name and which genealogical  organization with whom you are affiliated   You will receive an email response that you have to reply to or the subscription will not be finalized.

    Jan Meisels Allen

    Chairperson, IAJGS Public Records Access Monitoring Committee


  • 30 Sep 2020 1:33 PM | Anonymous

    The following announcement was written by FamilySearch:

    The FamilySearch Family History Library’s October 2020 free webinars will focus on German family history research. Selections include five progressive sessions on German Handwriting, Resources for German Research (beginner level), German Historical Geography, researching in German Historical Newspapers, and one class on the Württemberg Family Books.  Other classes include Using the FamilySearch Catalog, Adding Memories to Family Tree, and Finding Your Irish Ancestor’s Home.

    No registration is required for these online webinars. See the table of classes below for more details.

    If you cannot attend a live event, most sessions are recorded and can be viewed later online at your convenience at Family History Library classes and webinars.

    All class times are in Mountain Daylight Time (MDT).

    DATE/TIME CLASS WEBINAR
    Mon, Oct 5, 10:00 AM MDT Using the FamilySearch Catalog (Beginner) Yes
    Tue, Oct 6, 10:00 AM MDT Adding Memories to Family Tree (Beginner) Yes
    Sat, Oct 24, 10:00 AM MDT Resources on FamilySeach for German Research and Getting Help (Beginner) Yes
    Sat, Oct 24, 11:15 AM MDT Germany: Historical Geography (Intermediate) Yes
    Sat, Oct 24, 12:45 PM MDT Württemberg Family Books (Intermediate) Yes
    Sat, Oct 24, 2:00 PM MDT Using Historical Newspapers to Learn More About Your German Ancestors (Intermediate) Yes
    Mon, Oct 26, 9:00 AM MDT “Mournful Exodus”: Finding Your Irish Ancestor’s Home (Beginner) Yes
    Mon, Oct 26, 10:00 AM MDT German Handwriting Seminar, Day 1 (Intermediate) Yes
    Tue, Oct 27, 10:00 AM MDT German Handwriting Seminar, Day 2 (Intermediate) Yes
    Wed, Oct 28, 10:00 AM MDT German Handwriting Seminar, Day 3 (Intermediate) Yes
    Thu, Oct 29, 10:00 AM MDT German Handwriting Seminar, Day 4 (Intermediate) Yes
    Fri, Oct 30, 10:00 AM MDT German Handwriting Seminar, Day 5 (Intermediate) Yes

    Visit our website for more Classes and Online Webinars.

    About FamilySearch

    FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.


  • 30 Sep 2020 1:32 PM | Anonymous
    The following announcement was written by the State Archives of North Carolina:

    After several years of digitizing the Division of Negro Education records from the Department of Public Instruction record group, the African American Education digitization project is now completely online!

    This digital collection covers the day by day interactions of the Division of Negro Education with the African American community. The collection ranges from the early to mid 20th century and includes correspondence, articles, speeches, reports, newspaper clippings and more. You can read about previous additions to this collection in Part OnePart Two, and Part Three of this blog series. The last addition to the collection is the Director’s Office: Newspaper Clippings series. It contains newspaper clippings largely covering racial segregation in education throughout the Southern United States during the 1950’s.

    The following series are now online:

    For more information on African American education, check out these NCpedia pages:


  • 30 Sep 2020 11:48 AM | Anonymous

    The FamilySearch Family History Library’s October 2020 free webinars will focus on German family history research. Selections include five progressive sessions on German Handwriting, Resources for German Research (beginner level), German Historical Geography, researching in German Historical Newspapers, and one class on the Württemberg Family Books.  Other classes include Using the FamilySearch CatalogAdding Memories to Family Tree, and Finding Your Irish Ancestor’s Home.

    No registration is required for these online webinars. See the table of classes below for more details.

    If you cannot attend a live event, most sessions are recorded and can be viewed later online at your convenience at Family History Library classes and webinars.

    All class times are in Mountain Daylight Time (MDT).

    DATE/TIME CLASS WEBINAR
    Mon, Oct 5, 10:00 AM MDT Using the FamilySearch Catalog (Beginner) Yes
    Tue, Oct 6, 10:00 AM MDT Adding Memories to Family Tree (Beginner) Yes
    Sat, Oct 24, 10:00 AM MDT Resources on FamilySeach for German Research and Getting Help (Beginner) Yes
    Sat, Oct 24, 11:15 AM MDT Germany: Historical Geography (Intermediate) Yes
    Sat, Oct 24, 12:45 PM MDT Württemberg Family Books (Intermediate) Yes
    Sat, Oct 24, 2:00 PM MDT Using Historical Newspapers to Learn More About Your German Ancestors (Intermediate) Yes
    Mon, Oct 26, 9:00 AM MDT “Mournful Exodus”: Finding Your Irish Ancestor’s Home (Beginner) Yes
    Mon, Oct 26, 10:00 AM MDT German Handwriting Seminar, Day 1 (Intermediate) Yes
    Tue, Oct 27, 10:00 AM MDT German Handwriting Seminar, Day 2 (Intermediate) Yes
    Wed, Oct 28, 10:00 AM MDT German Handwriting Seminar, Day 3 (Intermediate) Yes
    Thu, Oct 29, 10:00 AM MDT German Handwriting Seminar, Day 4 (Intermediate) Yes
    Fri, Oct 30, 10:00 AM MDT German Handwriting Seminar, Day 5 (Intermediate) Yes

    Visit our website for more Classes and Online Webinars.

    About FamilySearch

    FamilySearch International is the largest genealogy organization in the world. FamilySearch is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources free online at FamilySearch.org or through over 5,000 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

  • 29 Sep 2020 12:00 PM | Anonymous

    The following announcement was written by Family History Hosting:

    Narragansett, Rhode Island, September 29, 2020 - Family History Hosting is pleased to announce the release of ORA version 1.10. ORA is the "Online Repository Assistant", a web browser extension combined with a Windows program to help you extract data from the web pages of your favorite online repositories and capture the information in your preferred genealogy program. ORA has several features that will save time, reduce errors, and increase the consistency of your data entry.

    Originally released in June with support for four popular repositories, ORA now supports twelve repositories:

    • Ancestry
    • Fold3
    • Australian Cemeteries Index
    • FreeReg
    • BillionGraves
    • General Register Office, UK
    • FamilySearch
    • Newspapers.com
    • Find a Grave
    • Nova Scotia Genealogy
    • Findmypast
    • Trove

    ORA users depend on it to save them time and effort:

    * "After weeks of using ORA to create source definitions for newspaper clippings and obituaries on Newspapers.com, I came across an obit I wanted [to cite] in the student newspaper of a college, found on the college's digital repository. ORA doesn't work there! What, write an obit source definition manually?? Can I remember how? It made me really appreciate how much work ORA has eliminated." - Terry

    * "I have made more progress in my research in the past two months that I've used ORA than in the two years prior." - Saul

    For more information about ORA, see its Introduction slideshow. The Introduction includes several videos that show ORA in action.

    ORA is sold as a subscription service, $24 USD per year. ORA is not affiliated with any of the repositories it supports. ORA does not do any searching for you; it evaluates pages you visit during your normal use of a repository and makes it faster and easier to extract the information you find. For Ancestry, Findmypast, and other fee-based repositories, you must have an account with that repository.

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